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The application of Appropriate Technology

Articles for Keyword "rain water"

Domestic Rainwater Harvesting

Posted on Oct 25, 2011

Domestic RWH is a simple mechanism to collect and store rainwater mainly for drinking and cooking. It may be household based or community based. The system uses a collection surface such as a roof, gutters to guide the rainwater, and a container to store the water. This paper involves domestic RWH only. We must remember that rainwater harvesting is not the ultimate answer to household water problems. Many factors have to be considered when selecting the appropriate water source. These include cost, climate, hydrology, social and political elements, as well as technology. All of these play a role in making the final choice of a suitable water supply scheme. RWH is only one of many possible choices. But RWH is often overlooked by planners, engineers and builders. You can read the whole of this document as a PDF file (850...

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Rain Water Harvesting Spreadsheet

Posted on Oct 25, 2011

This spreadsheet allows the user to size a DRWH storage tank, with a given surface catchment area (m2), and daily demand (litres). The spreadsheet contains rainfall data for Chiapas, Mexico, but this can be easily substituted for rainfall data in any given location. Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (137KB)

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Rainwater Reservoirs for Roof Catchment

Posted on Oct 25, 2011

A GTZ manual detailing different catchment possibilities, tank designs, guttering and downpipes for domestic rainwater harvesting. This manual offers advice on a more professional approach towards rainwater catchment and the construction of different types of reservoirs. It also offers a selection of the most appropriate reservoir types and gives technical advice for the construction work. As far as possible it has been kept on a level which would allow an experienced bricklayer to use the information or a building technician acting as Clerk of Works or Supervisor to advise bricklayers and plasterers on the site. It is not suitable for laymen in the construction field. Just as it is not possible to learn the technique of bricklaying by reading a book, it is not possible to write a construction manual imparting all the knowledge needed for people without the practical experience in the construction field. You can read the whole of this document as a PDF file (1.1...

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Roof Water Harvesting

Posted on Oct 25, 2011

The most detailed and complete manual on domestic rainwater harvesting we could find in the entire world, by the IRC. ‘Rainwater harvesting’ is a widely used term covering all those techniques whereby rain is intercepted and used ‘close’ to where it first reaches the earth. The term has been applied to arrangements to cause rainfall to percolate the ground rather than run off its surface, to forms of flood control, to the construction of small reservoirs to capture run-off water so that it can be used for cattle or micro-irrigation and to the collection of run-off from roofs and other impermeable surfaces. Thus, roofwater harvesting is a subset of rainwater harvesting, albeit an important one. This handbook covers only roofwater harvesting. This handbook has been written to assist NGO and government staff responsible for implementing domestic roofwater harvesting systems or programmes. It is also meant to serve as a source of material for rainwater harvesting associations preparing national design guidelines in local languages. Finally, it could be used by individual householders or masons literate in English to design single roofwater harvesting systems. Part A (Chapters 1 to 4) is focused on answering the question “When should DRWH be considered as a water supply option for a specified location or country?” This entails addressing other questions, such as, “How might DRWH be combined with other water sources?” and “How can DRWH systems be delivered?” Thus, Part A is aimed at those with responsibility for choosing technology – for example managers of NGO and governmental water programmes. The rest of the handbook, Part B, is aimed at those implementing DRWH programmes and concentrates on which of the many forms of DRWH should be used in particular circumstances. Read the whole of this document as a PDF file (3.4...

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Small Community Water Supplies

Posted on Oct 24, 2011

This book is a very good place to start learning about building a water supply. It covers all the things that you will need to know about sourcing water including rain water harvesting, spring, wells and surface water. It also has sections on water quality and treatment. This book is made available here as PDF files. View or download the whole book in one file ( 9.8mb PDF file) 0r view the book chapter by chapter: Chapter 1: Introduction (92kb PDF file) Chapter 2: Planning and Management (124kb PDF file) Chapter 3: Small community water services in Central and Eastern European Countries – situation, challenges, needs and developments (100kb PDF file) Chapter 4: Water quality and quantity (112kb PDF file) Chapter 5: Integrated Water Resources Management (128kb PDF file) Chapter 6: Artificial recharge (636kb PDF file) Chapter 7: Rainwater harvesting (460kb PDF file) Chapter 8: Spring water tapping (1mb PDF file) Chapter 9: Pumping (500kb PDF file) Chapter 10: Groundwater withdrawal (1.7mb PDF file) Chapter 11: Surface water intake and small dams (772kb PDF file) Chapter 12: Water treatment (244kb PDF file) Chapter 13: Aeration (168kb PDF file) Chapter 14: Coagulation and flocculation (296kb PDF file) Chapter 15: Sedimentation (212kb PDF file) Chapter 16: Multi-stage filtration technology (688kb PDF file) Chapter 17: Rapid filtration (2.2mb PDF file) Chapter 18: Desalination technology (412kb PDF file) Chapter 19: Disinfection (292kb PDF file) Chapter 20: Water transmission (888kb PDF file) Chapter 21: Water distribution (1.3mb PDF file) Chapter 22: Technologies for fluoride removal (1.1mb PDF file) Chapter 23: Technologies for arsenic removal from groundwater (336kb PDF file) Chapter 24: Water supply in disasters and emergencies (1mb PDF...

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